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Thu May 26, 2022 18:59
Videos:

1.  Klaus Schwab — A Conversation With Albert Bourla, CEO of Pfizer (play 3:00 mins) 2. Ft. Daniel Nolan – Speaking about misinformation and Truth  (19:00) 3. This Western priest can afford to speak frankly. He has nothing to lose and no one to fear (2:29) 4. You heard it from Mr Twitter himself – Elon Musk (0:43) 5. FDA Limits J&J Vaccine “Trust the science “ – ABC News Clip (0:27) 6. What is Monkeypox and Was It Planned For A Year Ago – Ben Swann (6:34) 7. Ivory Hecker – Americans are done panicking about viruses. 8. Bill Gates – ” We didn’t understand that it’s a fairly low fatality rate” (0:30)

Articles of Interest:

FBI Conducted Potentially Millions of Searches of Americans’ Data Last Year, Report Says

I FOUND IT!!! Why do Ukrainians tie people to poles?

Antioxidant-rich grape powder protects brain from damage caused by high fat and high sugar diets: Study Taipei Medical University (Taiwan), May 17, 2022

Antioxidants from grape powder helped ease hyperglycaemia-related cognitive dysfunction in aged rats, a study discovered.

Researchers from the Taipei Medical University said polyphenols from grape powder produced antioxidative and blood sugar-lowering properties that reduced the damage caused by a high-fat-high-fructose (HFHF) diet.

Findings revealed that 6% grape powder group had reduced RAGE, or receptor for advanced glycation end products in the brain tissue.

“Inclusion of up to 6% grape powder in the diet markedly reduced RAGE expression and tau hyperphosphorylation, but upregulated the expression of Nrf2 and BDNF, as well as the phosphorylation of PI3K and ERK, in the brain tissues of aged rats fed the HFHF diet,” the researchers reported.

Thus, while long-term diet high in fructose and fat levels can cause hyperglycemia-related cognitive dysfunction in aged rats, grape powder supplementation can help ease the damaging changes in the brain protein related to neurodegeneration.

Excessive degradation of mitochondria is the tipping point from normal alcohol metabolism to alcoholic liver disease

Medical University of South Carolina, May 24, 2022

While most commonly known as “the powerhouses of the cell” because of their energy producing capabilities, mitochondria also play important roles in regulating the health of cells. These important structures can be damaged by alcohol consumption, which can cause them to rupture and release their DNA, proteins and lipids, collectively known as “damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs).”

To understand more fully how alcohol damages mitochondria, and how this leads to mitophagy, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) used an advanced imaging technique to investigate changes in mitochondrial function within the livers of mice that were exposed to alcohol. Their findings, published online on March 16 in the journal Autophagy, demonstrated that exposure to alcohol causes a specific type of mitochondrial damage called depolarization. In a completely novel discovery, they found that it is this depolarization that indicates to the cell that the mitochondria are damaged and thereby causes activation of the mitophagy machinery to remove the damaged mitochondria before they can cause harm.

The current study determined that mitochondrial injury, specifically depolarization, initiates mitophagy to prevent damaged mitochondria from accumulating in cells. Blocking depolarization after ethanol exposure also blocks mitophagy, preventing mitochondrial depletion.

Flavonoids may slow lung function decline due to aging

Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, May 22, 2022

Previous research has shown that the plant-produced chemicals known as flavonoids have beneficial antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Anthocyanins, the type of flavonoid investigated in the current study, have been detected in lung tissue shortly after being ingested, and in animals models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The plant chemicals appear to reduce mucus and inflammatory secretions.

The researchers analyzed data from 463 adults (average age: 44) who participated in the second and third European Community Respiratory Health Surveys from 2002 to 2012.  The researchers also analyzed the association between anthocyanin consumption and lung function in smokers, those who had never smoked and those who quit. The association between high consumption of the flavonoids and reduced lung function decline appeared to be stronger among both never smokers and those who had quit than in the general study population. Among smokers, the study did not find an association between anthocyanin intake and lung function.

“Our study suggests that the general population could benefit from consuming more fruits rich in these flavonoids like berries, particularly those who have given up smoking or have never smoked, Dr. Larsen said. 

Medication doesn’t help kids with ADHD learn, study finds

Florida International University, May 24, 2022

For decades, most physicians, parents and teachers have believed that stimulant medications help children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) learn. However, in the first study of its kind, researchers found medication has no detectable impact on how much children with ADHD learn in the classroom.

Approximately 10% of children in the U.S. are diagnosed with ADHD and more than 90% of them are prescribed stimulant medication as the main form of treatment in school settingsbecause most physicians believe that medication will result in better academic achievement.

Researchers evaluated 173 children between the ages of 7 and 12 with ADHD participating in the center’s Summer Treatment Program, a comprehensive eight-week summer camp program for children with ADHD and related behavioral, emotional and learning challenges.  Each child was randomized to be medicated with a sustained-release stimulant medication during either the first or second of the instructional phases, receiving a placebo during the other.

Contrary to expectations, researchers found that children learned the same amount of science, social studies, and vocabulary content whether they were taking the medication or the placebo.

Mediterranean diet may blunt air pollution’s ill health effects

NYU School of Medicine May 21, 2022

Eating a Mediterranean diet may protect people from some of the harm of long-term exposure to air pollution, and reduce their risk of dying from heart attacks, stroke and other causes of death, according to new research.

The researchers analyzed data from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) Diet and Health Study. Over 17 years, the study followed 548,699 people (average age 62 at enrollment) from 6 states. During that time, 126,835 people in the study group died.

The researchers created five groups of participants based on their level of adherence to a Mediterranean diet and linked participants to estimates of long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), nitrous oxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) based on census tract information.

When comparing those least and most adherent to a Mediterranean diet, the study found that:

  • Deaths from all causes increased by 5 percent for every 10 parts per billion (ppb) increase in long-term average NO2 exposure in those least adherent, compared to 2 percent among the most adherent.
  • Cardiovascular disease deaths increased by 17 percent for every 10 micrograms per cubic meter (ÎĽg/m3) increase in long-term average PM2.5 exposure in those least adherent, compared to 5 percent among the most adherent.
  • Cardiovascular disease deaths increased by 10 percent for every 10 ppb increase in NO2. exposure in those least adherent, compared to 2 percent among the most adherent.
  • Heart attack deaths increased by 20 percent for every 10 ÎĽg/m3 increase in PM2.5 exposure in those least adherent, compared to 5 percent among the most adherent.
  • Heart attack deaths increased by 12 percent for every single ppb increase in NO2 exposure in those least adherent, compared to 4 percent among the most adherent.
Why blueberries are an effective weapon in the war against Alzheimer’s disease University of Cincinnati,  May 21, 2022 Could a plump, little blueberry really hold colossal promise in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease? New research adds to the growing evidence that blueberries, bursting with antioxidants, could help diminish the devastating defects of dementia. Newly released study findings show that certain flavonoids found in blueberries could also hold the key to lessening the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers, led by Krikorian, believe that blueberries’ beneficial effects against Alzheimer’s could be due to certain flavonoids found in the berries. Known as anthocyanins, they have been shown to improve cognition in tests with animals. Those receiving the blueberry powder were found to exhibit improved brain function and cognitive performance compared to those in the control group, with better memory and improved access to words and concepts.  In another study, 94 people, aged 62 to 80, were divided into four groups. The subjects did not have diagnosed early-onset Alzheimer’s, but did report feelings of having their memory decline.Videos:

1.  Klaus Schwab — A Conversation With Albert Bourla, CEO of Pfizer (play 3:00 mins) 2. Ft. Daniel Nolan – Speaking about misinformation and Truth  (19:00) 3. This Western priest can afford to speak frankly. He has nothing to lose and no one to fear (2:29) 4. You heard it from Mr Twitter himself – Elon Musk (0:43) 5. FDA Limits J&J Vaccine “Trust the science “ – ABC News Clip (0:27) 6. What is Monkeypox and Was It Planned For A Year Ago – Ben Swann (6:34) 7. Ivory Hecker – Americans are done panicking about viruses. 8. Bill Gates – ” We didn’t understand that it’s a fairly low fatality rate” (0:30)

Articles of Interest:

FBI Conducted Potentially Millions of Searches of Americans’ Data Last Year, Report Says

I FOUND IT!!! Why do Ukrainians tie people to poles?

Antioxidant-rich grape powder protects brain from damage caused by high fat and high sugar diets: Study Taipei Medical University (Taiwan), May 17, 2022

Antioxidants from grape powder helped ease hyperglycaemia-related cognitive dysfunction in aged rats, a study discovered.

Researchers from the Taipei Medical University said polyphenols from grape powder produced antioxidative and blood sugar-lowering properties that reduced the damage caused by a high-fat-high-fructose (HFHF) diet.

Findings revealed that 6% grape powder group had reduced RAGE, or receptor for advanced glycation end products in the brain tissue.

“Inclusion of up to 6% grape powder in the diet markedly reduced RAGE expression and tau hyperphosphorylation, but upregulated the expression of Nrf2 and BDNF, as well as the phosphorylation of PI3K and ERK, in the brain tissues of aged rats fed the HFHF diet,” the researchers reported.

Thus, while long-term diet high in fructose and fat levels can cause hyperglycemia-related cognitive dysfunction in aged rats, grape powder supplementation can help ease the damaging changes in the brain protein related to neurodegeneration.

Excessive degradation of mitochondria is the tipping point from normal alcohol metabolism to alcoholic liver disease

Medical University of South Carolina, May 24, 2022

While most commonly known as “the powerhouses of the cell” because of their energy producing capabilities, mitochondria also play important roles in regulating the health of cells. These important structures can be damaged by alcohol consumption, which can cause them to rupture and release their DNA, proteins and lipids, collectively known as “damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs).”

To understand more fully how alcohol damages mitochondria, and how this leads to mitophagy, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) used an advanced imaging technique to investigate changes in mitochondrial function within the livers of mice that were exposed to alcohol. Their findings, published online on March 16 in the journal Autophagy, demonstrated that exposure to alcohol causes a specific type of mitochondrial damage called depolarization. In a completely novel discovery, they found that it is this depolarization that indicates to the cell that the mitochondria are damaged and thereby causes activation of the mitophagy machinery to remove the damaged mitochondria before they can cause harm.

The current study determined that mitochondrial injury, specifically depolarization, initiates mitophagy to prevent damaged mitochondria from accumulating in cells. Blocking depolarization after ethanol exposure also blocks mitophagy, preventing mitochondrial depletion.

Flavonoids may slow lung function decline due to aging

Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, May 22, 2022

Previous research has shown that the plant-produced chemicals known as flavonoids have beneficial antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Anthocyanins, the type of flavonoid investigated in the current study, have been detected in lung tissue shortly after being ingested, and in animals models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The plant chemicals appear to reduce mucus and inflammatory secretions.

The researchers analyzed data from 463 adults (average age: 44) who participated in the second and third European Community Respiratory Health Surveys from 2002 to 2012.  The researchers also analyzed the association between anthocyanin consumption and lung function in smokers, those who had never smoked and those who quit. The association between high consumption of the flavonoids and reduced lung function decline appeared to be stronger among both never smokers and those who had quit than in the general study population. Among smokers, the study did not find an association between anthocyanin intake and lung function.

“Our study suggests that the general population could benefit from consuming more fruits rich in these flavonoids like berries, particularly those who have given up smoking or have never smoked, Dr. Larsen said. 

Medication doesn’t help kids with ADHD learn, study finds

Florida International University, May 24, 2022

For decades, most physicians, parents and teachers have believed that stimulant medications help children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) learn. However, in the first study of its kind, researchers found medication has no detectable impact on how much children with ADHD learn in the classroom.

Approximately 10% of children in the U.S. are diagnosed with ADHD and more than 90% of them are prescribed stimulant medication as the main form of treatment in school settingsbecause most physicians believe that medication will result in better academic achievement.

Researchers evaluated 173 children between the ages of 7 and 12 with ADHD participating in the center’s Summer Treatment Program, a comprehensive eight-week summer camp program for children with ADHD and related behavioral, emotional and learning challenges.  Each child was randomized to be medicated with a sustained-release stimulant medication during either the first or second of the instructional phases, receiving a placebo during the other.

Contrary to expectations, researchers found that children learned the same amount of science, social studies, and vocabulary content whether they were taking the medication or the placebo.

Mediterranean diet may blunt air pollution’s ill health effects

NYU School of Medicine May 21, 2022

Eating a Mediterranean diet may protect people from some of the harm of long-term exposure to air pollution, and reduce their risk of dying from heart attacks, stroke and other causes of death, according to new research.

The researchers analyzed data from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) Diet and Health Study. Over 17 years, the study followed 548,699 people (average age 62 at enrollment) from 6 states. During that time, 126,835 people in the study group died.

The researchers created five groups of participants based on their level of adherence to a Mediterranean diet and linked participants to estimates of long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), nitrous oxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) based on census tract information.

When comparing those least and most adherent to a Mediterranean diet, the study found that:

  • Deaths from all causes increased by 5 percent for every 10 parts per billion (ppb) increase in long-term average NO2 exposure in those least adherent, compared to 2 percent among the most adherent.
  • Cardiovascular disease deaths increased by 17 percent for every 10 micrograms per cubic meter (ÎĽg/m3) increase in long-term average PM2.5 exposure in those least adherent, compared to 5 percent among the most adherent.
  • Cardiovascular disease deaths increased by 10 percent for every 10 ppb increase in NO2. exposure in those least adherent, compared to 2 percent among the most adherent.
  • Heart attack deaths increased by 20 percent for every 10 ÎĽg/m3 increase in PM2.5 exposure in those least adherent, compared to 5 percent among the most adherent.
  • Heart attack deaths increased by 12 percent for every single ppb increase in NO2 exposure in those least adherent, compared to 4 percent among the most adherent.
Why blueberries are an effective weapon in the war against Alzheimer’s disease University of Cincinnati,  May 21, 2022 Could a plump, little blueberry really hold colossal promise in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease? New research adds to the growing evidence that blueberries, bursting with antioxidants, could help diminish the devastating defects of dementia. Newly released study findings show that certain flavonoids found in blueberries could also hold the key to lessening the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers, led by Krikorian, believe that blueberries’ beneficial effects against Alzheimer’s could be due to certain flavonoids found in the berries. Known as anthocyanins, they have been shown to improve cognition in tests with animals. Those receiving the blueberry powder were found to exhibit improved brain function and cognitive performance compared to those in the control group, with better memory and improved access to words and concepts.  In another study, 94 people, aged 62 to 80, were divided into four groups. The subjects did not have diagnosed early-onset Alzheimer’s, but did report feelings of having their memory decline.
Wed May 25, 2022 19:02
Broccoli may beneficially affect microbiota diversity: Study University of Illinois

Consuming broccoli may change the diversity and composition of the microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract, says a new study.

Two hundred grams per day of broccoli for 17 days resulted in 37% increase in the proportion of Bacteroidetes relative to Firmicutes, according to data presented at the Experimental Biology meeting in Chicago this week by scientists from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, ARS-USDA, and the National Cancer Institute.

“These novel results reveal that broccoli consumption affects the diversity and composition of the GI microbiota of healthy adults,” they wrote in the FASEB Journal . “These data help fill the gap in knowledge related to the role of bacterial hydrolysis of phytonutrients.

“The increase in Bacteroides spp. is particularly relevant because Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron has been shown in vitro to utilize glucosinolates.”

 

Acupuncture possible treatment for dental anxiety

University of York

Researchers have found evidence that acupuncture could help people who experience dental anxiety.

Dental anxiety affects up to an estimated 30% of the adult population in countries world-wide. Patients can experience nausea, difficulty breathing and dizziness at the thought of going to the dentist, during an examination, and following treatment.

In a review of six trials with 800 patients, researchers used a points scale to measure anxiety and studies show that anxiety reduced by eight points when dental patients were given acupuncture as a treatment. This level of reduction is considered to be clinically relevant, which means that acupuncture could be a possibility for tackling dental anxiety.

Studies that compared anxiety levels between patients that received acupuncture and those that did not, showed a significant difference in anxiety scores during dental treatment. A clinically relevant reduction in anxiety was found when acupuncture was compared with not receiving acupuncture.

 

Omega-3 may help protect against adverse cardiovascular effects of pollution

Case Western University

An article published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology reported a protective effect for supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids against some of the harmful cardiovascular effects of exposure to air pollution in China.

The randomized, double-blinded trial included 65 healthy college students in Shanghai, China who received 2.5 grams fish oil as a source of omega-3 fatty acids or a placebo daily. During the last two months of the trial, the subjects participated in four health examinations that included blood pressure assessment and measurement of blood markers of inflammation, coagulation, endothelial function, oxidative stress, antioxidant activity, cardiometabolism and neuroendocrine stress response.

Campus levels of fine particulate matter air pollution (PM 2.5) measured during the course of the trial averaged 38 micrograms per cubic meter. The researchers observed greater stability of most biomarker levels in responses to changes in fine particulate matter exposure in the fish oil-treated group in comparison with the placebo group. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation was associated with beneficial effects for five blood biomarkers of inflammation, coagulation, endothelial function, oxidative stress, and neuroendocrine stress response. 

 

 

Snoring causes injuries and prevention of healing in the upper airways

Umea University (Sweden)

The recurrent vibrations caused by snoring can lead to injuries in the upper airways of people who snore heavily. This in turn, can cause swallowing dysfunction and render individuals more vulnerable for developing the severe condition obstructive sleep apnea. These findings are reported by researchers at UmeĂĄ University, Sweden. Their on-going research focuses on the processes behind vibratory damage and healing of the upper airway tract. The data generated will help identify people at high risk of developing sleep apnea and to find novel treatment strategies.

Researchers in UmeĂĄ have shown that snorers and sleep apnea patients have neuromuscular injuries in the upper respiratory tract. The injuries can be seen at both the structural and molecular level. Researchers could also observe a correlation between snoring and swallowing dysfunction as well as a relation between nerve damage and obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is characterized by repeated collapse of the upper respiratory tract leading to respiratory arrest during sleep, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.

The studies show that people who constantly snore heavily and have sleep apnea displayed a loss of nerves and muscle mass in the soft palate. Furthermore, the attempts by the body to heal damaged tissue were disturbed resulting in an abnormal muscle structure. Another interesting finding was that muscle fibres in the soft palate lacked or had a disturbed organization of certain structural proteins. These proteins stabilize the organelles of the muscle cell and support cellular structures related to energy production and muscle fibre contraction.

The researchers also found that a neurotransmitter that is normally associated with healing and regeneration of neurons was present in the muscle cells. This finding suggests that the body is trying to heal the injuries, but the recurrent snoring vibrations prevent proper healing. It becomes a vicious circle where snoring causes damage and at the same time disturb healing of injuries, which can lead to swallowing dysfunction and sleep apnea.

 

Study: Tai chi can reduce hypertension symptoms in young and middle-aged in-service staff

Zhei-jian Hospital (China)

Researchers from Zhejiang Hospital in China reported that practicing t’ai chi can help with hypertension. 

  • The treatment group practiced simplified t’ai chi for three months. On the other hand, the control group underwent general daily lifestyle intervention.
  • After one month of exercise, the participants who practiced t’ai chi experienced significant reductions in their systolic blood pressure, heart rate, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.
  • At the end of the intervention period, the t’ai chi group experienced substantial decreases in their BMI, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and blood sugar levels. Practicing t’ai chi also improved their quality of life.
  Lemongrass essential oil protects the liver from acetaminophen-induced injury

State University of Maringa (Brazil)

A study published in The American Journal of Chinese Medicine found that the essential oil extracted from lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) can protect the liver from damage caused by acetaminophen intake. 

  • They pretreated mice with 125, 250, or 500 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) of lemongrass essential oil or 200 mg/kg of a standard drug per day for seven days.
  • Then, they induced liver toxicity by administering 250 mg/kg dose of acetaminophen.
  • The researchers found that pretreatment with lemongrass essential oil significantly reduced the levels of liver disease markers alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP).
  • Inflammation in the liver was also reduced by lemongrass essential oil.
  • Liver lesions in mice were also improved after pretreatment with lemongrass essential oil.
  • Pretreatment with lemongrass essential oil increased antioxidant activity in the liver.
Broccoli may beneficially affect microbiota diversity: Study University of Illinois

Consuming broccoli may change the diversity and composition of the microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract, says a new study.

Two hundred grams per day of broccoli for 17 days resulted in 37% increase in the proportion of Bacteroidetes relative to Firmicutes, according to data presented at the Experimental Biology meeting in Chicago this week by scientists from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, ARS-USDA, and the National Cancer Institute.

“These novel results reveal that broccoli consumption affects the diversity and composition of the GI microbiota of healthy adults,” they wrote in the FASEB Journal . “These data help fill the gap in knowledge related to the role of bacterial hydrolysis of phytonutrients.

“The increase in Bacteroides spp. is particularly relevant because Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron has been shown in vitro to utilize glucosinolates.”

 

Acupuncture possible treatment for dental anxiety

University of York

Researchers have found evidence that acupuncture could help people who experience dental anxiety.

Dental anxiety affects up to an estimated 30% of the adult population in countries world-wide. Patients can experience nausea, difficulty breathing and dizziness at the thought of going to the dentist, during an examination, and following treatment.

In a review of six trials with 800 patients, researchers used a points scale to measure anxiety and studies show that anxiety reduced by eight points when dental patients were given acupuncture as a treatment. This level of reduction is considered to be clinically relevant, which means that acupuncture could be a possibility for tackling dental anxiety.

Studies that compared anxiety levels between patients that received acupuncture and those that did not, showed a significant difference in anxiety scores during dental treatment. A clinically relevant reduction in anxiety was found when acupuncture was compared with not receiving acupuncture.

 

Omega-3 may help protect against adverse cardiovascular effects of pollution

Case Western University

An article published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology reported a protective effect for supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids against some of the harmful cardiovascular effects of exposure to air pollution in China.

The randomized, double-blinded trial included 65 healthy college students in Shanghai, China who received 2.5 grams fish oil as a source of omega-3 fatty acids or a placebo daily. During the last two months of the trial, the subjects participated in four health examinations that included blood pressure assessment and measurement of blood markers of inflammation, coagulation, endothelial function, oxidative stress, antioxidant activity, cardiometabolism and neuroendocrine stress response.

Campus levels of fine particulate matter air pollution (PM 2.5) measured during the course of the trial averaged 38 micrograms per cubic meter. The researchers observed greater stability of most biomarker levels in responses to changes in fine particulate matter exposure in the fish oil-treated group in comparison with the placebo group. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation was associated with beneficial effects for five blood biomarkers of inflammation, coagulation, endothelial function, oxidative stress, and neuroendocrine stress response. 

 

 

Snoring causes injuries and prevention of healing in the upper airways

Umea University (Sweden)

The recurrent vibrations caused by snoring can lead to injuries in the upper airways of people who snore heavily. This in turn, can cause swallowing dysfunction and render individuals more vulnerable for developing the severe condition obstructive sleep apnea. These findings are reported by researchers at UmeĂĄ University, Sweden. Their on-going research focuses on the processes behind vibratory damage and healing of the upper airway tract. The data generated will help identify people at high risk of developing sleep apnea and to find novel treatment strategies.

Researchers in UmeĂĄ have shown that snorers and sleep apnea patients have neuromuscular injuries in the upper respiratory tract. The injuries can be seen at both the structural and molecular level. Researchers could also observe a correlation between snoring and swallowing dysfunction as well as a relation between nerve damage and obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is characterized by repeated collapse of the upper respiratory tract leading to respiratory arrest during sleep, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.

The studies show that people who constantly snore heavily and have sleep apnea displayed a loss of nerves and muscle mass in the soft palate. Furthermore, the attempts by the body to heal damaged tissue were disturbed resulting in an abnormal muscle structure. Another interesting finding was that muscle fibres in the soft palate lacked or had a disturbed organization of certain structural proteins. These proteins stabilize the organelles of the muscle cell and support cellular structures related to energy production and muscle fibre contraction.

The researchers also found that a neurotransmitter that is normally associated with healing and regeneration of neurons was present in the muscle cells. This finding suggests that the body is trying to heal the injuries, but the recurrent snoring vibrations prevent proper healing. It becomes a vicious circle where snoring causes damage and at the same time disturb healing of injuries, which can lead to swallowing dysfunction and sleep apnea.

 

Study: Tai chi can reduce hypertension symptoms in young and middle-aged in-service staff

Zhei-jian Hospital (China)

Researchers from Zhejiang Hospital in China reported that practicing t’ai chi can help with hypertension. 

  • The treatment group practiced simplified t’ai chi for three months. On the other hand, the control group underwent general daily lifestyle intervention.
  • After one month of exercise, the participants who practiced t’ai chi experienced significant reductions in their systolic blood pressure, heart rate, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.
  • At the end of the intervention period, the t’ai chi group experienced substantial decreases in their BMI, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and blood sugar levels. Practicing t’ai chi also improved their quality of life.
  Lemongrass essential oil protects the liver from acetaminophen-induced injury

State University of Maringa (Brazil)

A study published in The American Journal of Chinese Medicine found that the essential oil extracted from lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) can protect the liver from damage caused by acetaminophen intake. 

  • They pretreated mice with 125, 250, or 500 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) of lemongrass essential oil or 200 mg/kg of a standard drug per day for seven days.
  • Then, they induced liver toxicity by administering 250 mg/kg dose of acetaminophen.
  • The researchers found that pretreatment with lemongrass essential oil significantly reduced the levels of liver disease markers alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP).
  • Inflammation in the liver was also reduced by lemongrass essential oil.
  • Liver lesions in mice were also improved after pretreatment with lemongrass essential oil.
  • Pretreatment with lemongrass essential oil increased antioxidant activity in the liver.

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