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Human Rights in Ireland >>

Habitats along the Mayne river in Belcamp College endangered.

category dublin | environment | press release author Friday May 13, 2011 14:41author by Fores Friends Ireland Report this post to the editors

The Mayne river and associated woodlands which have been a habitat for a wide range of species, bats, kingfishers, otters and a wide range of native flora are under threat due to potential development.

The Mayne river and associated woodlands which have been a habitat for a wide range of species, bats, kingfishers, otters and a wide range of native flora are under threat due to potential development.
The lands formerly incorporated in Belcamp College is a unique riparian (along a river) woodland that stretches all the way from the N32 to the Malahide Road. The Mayne river which runs through the lands is the boundary between city and council and the woodlands had been preserved by the former owners the Oblate Fathers who provided important educational and spiritual education in the area for many years. While the general public are rightly concerned with the destruction of this important building and the Harry Clarke stained windows there is an equally serious damage to the environment proposed on the one hand by the present owner has in the past applied to build high density development which together with the new roads would destroy the unique ecology of the area. It behoves the city fathers and politicians to move to protect this unique riparian woodland that spans Dublin city and County.

Forest Friends, environmental organisation, is dedicated to the promotion of native trees and species and the halting of further biodiversity lost.

Forest.friends@hotmail.com tel: 01 546 0107

author by Tom - nonepublication date Fri May 13, 2011 17:17Report this post to the editors

I'm really sad to hear of this developement, I had no idea that wonderful woodland it under threat. As if we did not have enough development. The country is full of half built housing projects and empty holtels that no one wants. A few years ago when the so called boom was in full swing they cut down a load of horse chestnut trees beside me to allow for a new development which consisted of about 20 houses. The houses were never finished because the builder when BANG. When you drive past the place were the beautiful chestnut were all you see now is a row of half built houses surrounded by rusty scaffolding, its an absolute eye sore. In the carzy country that is Ireland the local council is now propsoing to demolish the half bilt houses and replace them with a public park ( with new trees). It nauseating to think that they were alowed to cut down the beautiful chestnue tress for houses that no one wanted.

I hope this does not happen in Belcamp woods, I played in those woods as a kid and have many happey memories there. I would appriciate if you could post some more infomatuion about this story.
Good post keep up the good work.

author by Homelesspublication date Fri May 13, 2011 20:26Report this post to the editors

" It nauseating to think that they were alowed to cut down the beautiful chestnue tress for houses that no one wanted."

Actually, I don't own my own home and suffer the lack of security and the proclivities of greedy unscrupulous landlords. I would love to have one of those houses to live in. But such is the petty greediness rooted deep in our society that people would rather let them rot then knock them down than house poor homeless people like me.

author by Tom - nonepublication date Sat May 14, 2011 09:32Report this post to the editors

Sorry to hear that you are a homeless person but I think you are missing the point. The thousands of houses were not built for homeless people they were built for the property market. You either bought or rented, that just the way it is. You could demolish 80% of the half built houses that are littering the countryside and you could still house all of Irelands homeless in the remaing 20% with some to spare.

In rural ireland Greedy developers who could not see no further that the end of their noses built housing estates in smalll villages. There is no public transport in these villages, they are 40/50 miles away from the nearest town/city. They are unsustainable, there is no work near by, no proper facilities.
Most of the roads into these housing estates are not finished, there is no streetlighting on the roads around the houses.

You dont solve the problem homlessness by building more houses. The market has collasped. Unfortunatley it has not sunk in with some developers yet, greed makes ye blind.

Most of the houses that I was refaring to are only half built. The guys who owned them are broke, like I said they went BANG. To finish building the houses I'm refaring to will take a lot of money. Who has this money ? thats the crux of the problem, no one has any money.

There are plenty of finished houses that lying there, why dont you try and get one of those ?

 
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