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Morgan Kelly tells it like it is AGAIN. Essential reading.

category international | anti-capitalism | other press author Sunday May 08, 2011 11:02author by V for vendetta Report this post to the editors

Morgan Kelly has done it again. He has cut through the Nonsense coming from our government and the media and got to the core of the matter. This article is the best summary of our current state of affairs in regard to the banking debt and our future that I have seen to date. I hope those idiots in Lenister house and the great sir Patrick Honahan are reading their sunday times today. Because its the only real sense I've seen on the matter lately, buried deep on the comments page as it was
here we go.......
here we go.......

Original Introduction:
-------------------------------
Morgan Kelly has done it again. He has cut through the Nonsense coming from our government and the media and got to the core of the matter. This article is the best summary of our current state of affairs in regard to the banking debt and our future that I have seen to date. I hope those idiots in Lenister house and the great sir Patrick Honahan are reading their sunday times today. Because its the only real sense I've seen on the matter lately, buried deep on the comments page as it was. But they couldn't really refuse the article. And they couldn't hide it much more than this either. This article is a political bombshell. I hope everyone in the country reads it.

And I hope professor Morgan doesn't mind me quoting a decent bit of it here in the national interests. Thanks for taking the time Professor. I'm putting this up here so as many as possible of the Irish people will have an opportunity to become aware of and read your piece.

For obvious reasons you'll need to go to the irish times online site to read the rest. Its up there free to read for now. Link at end of article.

____________________

Quote:

"While most people would trace our ruin to to the bank guarantee of September 2008, the real error was in sticking with the guarantee long after it had become clear that the bank losses were insupportable. Brian Lenihan’s original decision to guarantee most of the bonds of Irish banks was a mistake, but a mistake so obvious and so ridiculous that it could easily have been reversed. The ideal time to have reversed the bank guarantee was a few months later when Patrick Honohan was appointed governor of the Central Bank and assumed de facto control of Irish economic policy.

As a respected academic expert on banking crises, Honohan commanded the international authority to have announced that the guarantee had been made in haste and with poor information, and would be replaced by a restructuring where bonds in the banks would be swapped for shares.

Instead, Honohan seemed unperturbed by the possible scale of bank losses, repeatedly insisting that they were “manageable”. Like most Irish economists of his generation, he appeared to believe that Ireland was still the export-driven powerhouse of the 1990s, rather than the credit-fuelled Ponzi scheme it had become since 2000; and the banking crisis no worse than the, largely manufactured, government budget crisis of the late 1980s.

Rising dismay at Honohan’s judgment crystallised into outright scepticism after an extraordinary interview with Bloomberg business news on May 28th last year. Having overseen the Central Bank’s “quite aggressive” stress tests of the Irish banks, he assured them that he would have “the two big banks, fixed by the end of the year. I think it’s quite good news The banks are floating away from dependence on the State and will be free standing”.

Honohan’s miscalculation of the bank losses has turned out to be the costliest mistake ever made by an Irish person. Armed with Honohan’s assurances that the bank losses were manageable, the Irish government confidently rode into the Little Bighorn and repaid the bank bondholders, even those who had not been guaranteed under the original scheme. This suicidal policy culminated in the repayment of most of the outstanding bonds last September.

Disaster followed within weeks. Nobody would lend to Irish banks, so that the maturing bonds were repaid largely by emergency borrowing from the European Central Bank: by November the Irish banks already owed more than €60 billion. Despite aggressive cuts in government spending, the certainty that bank losses would far exceed Honohan’s estimates led financial markets to stop lending to Ireland.

On November 16th, European finance ministers urged Lenihan to accept a bailout to stop the panic spreading to Spain and Portugal, but he refused, arguing that the Irish government was funded until the following summer. Although attacked by the Irish media for this seemingly delusional behaviour, Lenihan, for once, was doing precisely the right thing. Behind Lenihan’s refusal lay the thinly veiled threat that, unless given suitably generous terms, Ireland could hold happily its breath for long enough that Spain and Portugal, who needed to borrow every month, would drown.

At this stage, with Lenihan looking set to exploit his strong negotiating position to seek a bailout of the banks only, Honohan intervened. As well as being Ireland’s chief economic adviser, he also plays for the opposing team as a member of the council of the European Central Bank, whose decisions he is bound to carry out. In Frankfurt for the monthly meeting of the ECB on November 18th, Honohan announced on RTÉ Radio 1’s Morning Ireland that Ireland would need a bailout of “tens of billions”.

Rarely has a finance minister been so deftly sliced off at the ankles by his central bank governor. And so the Honohan Doctrine that bank losses could and should be repaid by Irish taxpayers ran its predictable course with the financial collapse and international bailout of the Irish State.

Ireland’s Last Stand began less shambolically than you might expect. The IMF, which believes that lenders should pay for their stupidity before it has to reach into its pocket, presented the Irish with a plan to haircut €30 billion of unguaranteed bonds by two-thirds on average. Lenihan was overjoyed, according to a source who was there, telling the IMF team: “You are Ireland’s salvation.”

The deal was torpedoed from an unexpected direction. At a conference call with the G7 finance ministers, the haircut was vetoed by US treasury secretary Timothy Geithner who, as his payment of $13 billion from government-owned AIG to Goldman Sachs showed, believes that bankers take priority over taxpayers. The only one to speak up for the Irish was UK chancellor George Osborne, but Geithner, as always, got his way. An instructive, if painful, lesson in the extent of US soft power, and in who our friends really are."


[The article gets better and better and eventually offers the only real solution to our current crisis from our current position that I can see]

You can currently read the rest of the article here:
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/opinion/2011/0507/1224296372123.html


*Many thanks to BC for bringing this article to my attention*

 #   Title   Author   Date 
   Morgan's Kelly analysis is correct. Not clear of his views on how to go from here.     T    Tue May 10, 2011 01:04 
   Puzzled     W. Finnerty    Wed May 11, 2011 08:40 
   Mr     TC    Wed Jul 13, 2011 12:59 
   Why Geithner said no     Rian    Sun Jul 24, 2011 11:15 


 
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