Upcoming Events

International | Miscellaneous

no events match your query!

New Events


no events posted in last week

User Preferences

  • Language - en | ga
  • text size >>
  • make this your indymedia front page make this your indymedia front page

Blog Feeds


Irish Left Review
Joined up thinking for the Irish Left

offsite link We Make Our Own History: Discussion and Book Launch Mon Nov 16, 2015 13:59 | Laurence Cox

offsite link Reflections on Water Movement and Right2Change Development Tue Nov 10, 2015 14:31 | Jimmy Dignam

offsite link November Socialist Voice is Now Available Online Mon Nov 09, 2015 21:49 | Communist Party of Ireland

offsite link Championing the Self-Employed Thu Nov 05, 2015 22:51 | Michael Taft

offsite link Begruding the Recovery Tue Nov 03, 2015 15:36 | Michael Taft

Irish Left Review >>

Spirit of Contradiction

offsite link Kautsky – The crisis of capitalism and the shortening of working time Mon Nov 09, 2015 22:34 | James O'Brien

offsite link How to do better things with words Fri Oct 23, 2015 07:38 | modulus

offsite link Syriza and Israel: Syriza’s response Thu Aug 20, 2015 18:10 | yeksmesh

offsite link What does a Corbyn victory mean? Tue Aug 18, 2015 00:32 | Sami El-Sayed

offsite link SYRIZA: Was capitulation inevitable? Fri Jul 17, 2015 14:14 | Sami El-Sayed

Spirit of Contradiction >>

Public Inquiry
Interested in maladministration. Estd. 2005

offsite link Diamaid Ferriter: Mean-spirited in giving credit to Atheist Ireland

offsite link Fintan O’Toole: Falling for the myth that the people are to blame Anthony

offsite link Tom Lyons: A journalist unlikely to ask the tough questions Anthony

offsite link Breaking news: Sinn Fein responsible for IBRC farce Anthony

offsite link Atheist Ireland banned while Iona Institute enjoys full access to schools Anthony

Public Inquiry >>

NAMA Wine Lake

offsite link Farewell from NWL Sun May 19, 2013 14:00 | namawinelake

offsite link Happy 70th Birthday, Michael Sun May 19, 2013 14:00 | namawinelake

offsite link Of the Week? Sat May 18, 2013 00:02 | namawinelake

offsite link Noonan denies IBRC legal fees loan approval to Paddy McKillen was in breach of E... Fri May 17, 2013 14:23 | namawinelake

offsite link Gayle Killilea Dunne asks to be added as notice party in Sean Dunne?s bankruptcy Fri May 17, 2013 12:30 | namawinelake

NAMA Wine Lake >>

US court deals heavy blow against Web freedom

category international | miscellaneous | news report author Tuesday January 14, 2014 21:32author by newsmedia Report this post to the editors

Greedy ISPs move to cash in on providing tiered Internet access
Judges at a federal appeal court in Washington have dealt what could well be a mortal blow to the freedom of the Internet.

Three judges sitting at the court rejected the Federal Communications Commission's Open Internet Order appeal on the grounds that its Net Neutrality was founded on 'questionable legal framework' when the agency adopted its Net Neutrality rules in 2010.

Net neutrality was part of President Barack Obama's campaign platform in 2008. The FCC and its backers said allowing Internet providers to charge content companies more for faster service could threaten future innovation by making it harder for startups and others without deep pockets to reach consumers effectively

The ruling means that ight now there is no one protecting Internet users from ISPs that block or discriminate against websites, applications or services. Major Internet service supply companies such as Verizon. At&T and Comcast will now be able to block or slow down any website, application or service they like and be able to create tiered pricing structures with fast lanes for those who can afford the tolls and slow lanes for everyone else.

The court also threw out an FCC rule that barred providers from blocking Internet traffic outright.

Verizon wants the ability to charge content companies for faster connections with their end users. The ruling could cause headaches for companies like Netflix Inc., which doesn't want to pay broadband providers extra to deliver its popular movie-streaming service to consumers.

Two of the three judges suggested the FCC might have some room to revive its rules with certain modifications. One possibility would be to classify broadband Internet as a telecommunications service, the designation that has long applied to regular telephone service.

The decision by the court brought immediate responses by action groups freepress.net and RootsAction.Org which have both launched petitions to defende Internet freedoms.

The FCC's "open Internet" rules, often referred to as net-neutrality rules, were passed in 2010 and designed to ensure Internet service providers treated similar content on their broadband pipes equally. Verizon Communications Inc. sued to block the rules, saying the FCC lacked the authority to impose them.

A statement released by Media watchdog and advocacy agency Free Press President and CEO Craig Aaron said: "We’re disappointed that the court came to this conclusion. Its ruling means that Internet users will be pitted against the biggest phone and cable companies — and in the absence of any oversight, these companies can now block and discriminate against their customers’ communications at will.

"The compromised Open Internet Order struck down today left much to be desired, but it was a step toward maintaining Internet users’ freedom to go where they wanted, when they wanted, and communicate freely online. Now, just as Verizon promised it would in court, the biggest broadband providers will race to turn the open and vibrant Web into something that looks like cable TV. They’ll establish fast lanes for the few giant companies that can afford to pay exorbitant tolls and reserve the slow lanes for everyone else.

"The FCC — under the leadership of former Chairman Julius Genachowski — made a grave mistake when it failed to ground its open Internet rules on solid legal footing. Internet users will pay dearly for the previous chairman’s lack of political will. That’s why we need to fix the problems the agency could have avoided in the first place.

"New FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler recently stated that the FCC must have the ability to protect broadband users and preserve the Internet’s fundamental open architecture. In order to do that, he must act quickly to restore reassert the FCC’s clear authority over our nation’s communications infrastructure. The agency must follow its statutory mandate to make broadband communications networks open, accessible, reliable and affordable for everyone.

"We look forward to working with Chairman Wheeler and the rest of the Commission to protect and preserve real Net Neutrality."

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has voiced opposition to regulating broadband Internet providers like phone companies once were, and many Republicans and others in Washington criticize the idea as an example of excessive federal regulation.

Mr. Wheeler, a supporter of net neutrality, recently argued he has the power to police Internet service providers on an individual basis if their behavior is anticompetitive or prevents consumers from accessing the Web.

Reacting to the ruling, Mr. Wheeler said the FCC would consider appealing to the Supreme Court. "I am committed to maintaining our networks as engines for economic growth, test beds for innovative services and products, and channels for all forms of speech," he said.

Related Link: http://www.newsmedianews.com/headlines.php?subaction=sh...news&
author by Tpublication date Wed Jan 15, 2014 20:40Report this post to the editors

Firstly, it is good that there will be an appeal to this awful ruling, but should it stick and given the climate of corporate control of society, it may, then this ruling would allow ISPs and Telecos to effectively price out of existence alternative and independent sites such as Indymedia, but more importantly many of the thousands of blogs and other independent news sites that don't have the big budgets. The way it would work is that they would impose costs for downloads from a site, so the more traffic it got, the more its costs would go up and it would be a self limiting thing for sites run on little or no costs and often run by volunteers or personnel effort.

It could easily effect the way search engines do their job too, because the incentive would quickly change so that it is only cost effective to properly index the big commercial sites.

In many ways this parallels the development of radio. In the early days of radio, if you wanted one, you bought a kit and assembled it yourself, but it also meant the early days of radio were full of enthusiasts and it was very open and all sorts of people were transmitting all kinds of things. Apparently there was a real buzz with it. Then state control stepped in and said you need a license to transmit. That effectively killed it. The difference here is that loss of Net Neutrality means you will find it hard to get any traffic to or from your site without some kind of commercial backing and given commercialism is by its nature part of the corporate controlled right wing capitalist system, then that kills off nearly everything else

author by Krummipublication date Wed Feb 05, 2014 13:09Report this post to the editors

It was kind of inevitable that the internet would be curtailed at some stage , despite it's substantial dark side it's given access to information and international communication on a previously unseen scale. I'm not sure if it was an experiment that got out of hand by the powers that be but it's definitely created some issues for them and opened doors that can't be closed. I know a lot of posters on this site seem to be pretty left brained ( no offense ) but it's probably time we stepped it up a gear and evolved ourselves instead of being reliant on technology.

© 2001-2015 Independent Media Centre Ireland. Unless otherwise stated by the author, all content is free for non-commercial reuse, reprint, and rebroadcast, on the net and elsewhere. Opinions are those of the contributors and are not necessarily endorsed by Independent Media Centre Ireland. Disclaimer | Privacy